Weight training for weight loss

Written by Jared Adams
Bushido Strength Hub

“Weight or fat loss is one of the most common reasons that motivates people to seek the help of a personal trainer or strength and conditioning coach. By working together we can help find a solution to achieve your goals that fits with your lifestyle “

Jared Adams, Bushido Strength Hub

Weight training or resistance training both have some key benefits over a more traditional approach to weight loss like focusing on just basic activities like running, cycling and swimming alone.

Some might consider using the ‘energy in vs energy out’ approach to help lose weight where the goal is to expend more calories than you consume.

With an entry level fitness tracker and a basic understanding of calories you could monitor daily energy intake and energy out. This approach alone can make you feel stuck with a constant cycle of monitoring.

While you can modify the intensity of physical activity, monitoring energy in and out alone create times when you are running 7 days each week to make up for those extra treats during the week.

What if there was a more sustainable way of keeping the weight off? Or something that you could use in conjunction with this approach?

The great news – there is an alternative.

By training with resistance or weights you can develop more muscle. The more muscle you have, the higher your resting metabolic rate (RMR) – that’s how many calories your body requires to function at rest.

Your resting metabolic rate accounts for around 60-75% of total energy expenditure and that’s before you add any weight training sessions.

This approach can provide a more sustainable way to help you keep your weight down long term.

As you grow muscle your body needs more calories just to hit the baseline of 60-75%.

Following weight training your RMR is increased for up to 8 hours to help with nutrient uptake and restoration of the muscles used during training.

So what’s the perfect exercise plan?

Everyone will have different needs and abilities that should be considered in developing an exercise plan.

As a guide, 10 to 12 repetitions seems to be the golden range. You should aim to progress the intensity of these movements each week with increased weight, repetitions or total sets to ensure a progressive overload. This gives your muscles what they need to continue to grow and in turn, store more energy.

This is not to say this is the best way to approach your weight loss, simply that weight training can very well be complimented with a traditional approach for additional cardiovascular health or simply some active recovery 

Need help to create your perfect exercise plan?

If youโ€™d like to work with Jared or the Bushido Strength Hub team connect with them on Instagram or Facebook.

Did you know that some health funds offer rebates for personal training to support healthy lifestyles?

To find out how you might be able to claim the costs of personal training or gym memberships with your health insurance speak with a member of the Care To Compare team on 1300 76 76 00.

Top 5 myths about osteoarthritis

“If somebody says they have arthritis they are most likely talking about osteoarthritis. If you are struggling with arthritis or joint pain see your health professional to discuss some treatment strategies suitable for your situation.”

Dr Matt Corbin, Osteopath, Six Core Outcomes

Fun fact: There is more arthritis today than there has ever been and we have never been more sedentary. Perhaps it’s time we stop calling it wear and tear?

Here are the top 5 myths about osteoarthritis.

1. Scans

Scans can not and do not predict your level of pain or disability regardless of how severe the arthritis may appear on an image.

2. rest

Rest or avoiding activities completely can actually make pain worse in the long run.

3. exercise

Exercise is not dangerous. Safe, graded exposure to painful activities can actually help reduce pain by improving your strength, capacity and tolerance.

4. Surgery

Surgery is not the only answer. In fact 20% of people who undergo joint replacements donโ€™t achieve pain relief. Surgery is suggested for people who have undergone thorough non-surgical management unsuccessfully.

5. Pain

Pain does not reflect the amount of damage. Much like on a scan, the amount of damage does not reflect the level of pain. They do not always correlate.

Do I need private health insurance to see an osteo, physio or Chiro?

No. All practitioners can see both private and public patients.

Your health insurance can provide you with rebates when you visit an osteopath, physiotherapist or chiropractor. Check with your health fund what benefits are available.

Interested in Working with an osteopath?

Book an appointment with Dr Matt Corbin at Six Core Outcomes or find your local Osteopath.

What’s the difference between an Osteo, Physio and Chiro?

“The assumption is that the professions are all very different, with various techniques & skill sets. Whilst some subtle differences may exist, the truth is that we are more alike than some (clinicians) might like to admit!”

Dr Matt Corbin, Osteopath, Six Core Outcomes

If youโ€™ve ever wondered what the difference between an Osteopath, Physiotherapist and a Chiropractor is – you are not alone! It can be a confusing discussion within the healthcare system so I can only imagine how confusing it can be for patients just looking for help.

Education & Qualifications

Each profession is registered and regulated by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA).

Each profession is accredited after completing 4-5 years of education at university.

Each profession consists of a mixture of hands-on treatment and rehabilitative exercise designed to help those in pain.

whatโ€™s the difference?

Itโ€™s important to note that โ€˜Osteoโ€™, โ€˜Physioโ€™ & โ€˜Chiroโ€™ are professions – Theyโ€™re not treatments or treatment styles. Each is qualified to provide diagnosis, management and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. 

In the modern age of evidence-based medicine youโ€™ll start noticing that the best practitioners will all practice in a very similar way. The secret is out – Gone are the days where a 5-10 minute appointment for an โ€œadjustmentโ€ is considered optimal health care.

Dr Matt Corbin (Osteopath) at Six Core Outcomes using manual therapy for patient.

The real difference comes between practitioners, not professions. 

The best practitioners get you moving.

The best practitioners build confidence, not fear.

The best practitioners get you off the table, and back to the activities you love.

Avoid somebody who spends the majority of time doing things to you, find yourself a practitioner who empowers you with self-care strategies to look after your own body. 

How do you choose the right osteo, Physio or Chiro?

Choose the person, not the profession. To help find your next Osteopath, Physiotherapist or Chiropractor use this checklist to help guide your decision.

Find a practitioner who:

  • Seems genuine, empathetic and understanding
  • Educates, empowers and builds confidence 
  • Works with you to find the right management plan suited to your goals
  • Promotes self-care strategies alongside hands-on treatments
  • Encourages you to ask questions during your appointment.

Do I need private health insurance to see an osteo, physio or Chiro?

No. All practitioners can see both private and public patients.

Your health insurance can provide you with rebates when you visit an osteopath, physiotherapist or chiropractor. Check with your health fund what benefits are available.

Interested in Working with an osteopath?

Book an appointment with Dr Matt Corbin at Six Core Outcomes or find your local Osteopath.

5 things to consider when choosing a personal trainer

Written by Jared Adams
Bushido Strength Hub

“Qualifications alone don’t always equal results. Look for a coach that either walks the walk, is able to produce consistent results or better yet, both. This is a good sign they are able to overcome the obstacles you will almost definitely face on the way to your goals.”

Jared Adams, Bushido Strength Hub

  1. Does the personal trainer or coach’s style of training suit you?

Iโ€™ve had clients that don’t enjoy my methodology. It’s a recipe for friction down the track and mostly due to a lack of understanding or explanation about your plan. When you havenโ€™t bought into your own plan you’re unlikely to see it through.

This doesn’t mean firing your coach because they prescribe you less carbohydrates or recommend cutting back on energy drinks.

Your plan needs to be something you can not only execute but be excited about. 

  1. Are you prepared to share your real goals or motivations?

Your goals may require more than just a piece of paper with a generic exercise selection and nutrition plan. If this were the case you could employ Google for free. As a personal trainer or strength and conditioning coach it helps to understand the whole picture.

By sharing your goals and motivations your trainer or coach can use their experience to develop the right training and nutrition plan that works for you and your lifestyle.

  1. Are you paying for quality or quantity?

The professional fees you pay a personal trainer or strength and conditioning coach isnโ€™t directly linked to the value they provide. Fitness professionals set their own fees and are often in-line with their qualifications and experience.

Consider why it is you need a personal trainer. Is it to supervise your movements or to coach you to your goals?

With knowledge and experience your personal trainer or coach can help spend less time on problem solving to help you implement proven and established strategies to help you reach your goals sooner.

  1. What will your personal trainer or coach teach you?

The goal of a coach is to educate. You should be able to ask questions and either have those questions answered or be supported to get the answers from a professional with that expertise. Your role as the client should be to have an open mind to information that might sit outside your belief system.

Let’s assume youโ€™ve considered the above points and found yourself a personal trainer or coach of interest. Have you asked yourself why youโ€™re seeking them out in the first place? Is it because what youโ€™ve done in the past hasnโ€™t given you the result you were after?

Stepping outside your comfort zone with your personal trainer or coach might just be the formula you needed to reach your goals.

  1. How will your personal trainer or coach measure your results?

Look for a personal trainer or coach that measures your results in more ways than one. Weight loss might be the initial reason you want a personal trainer or coach however weight loss is the result you get when you accurately and consistently measure all variables of your fitness journey.

Your personal trainer or coach should be helping you with this. In doing so, they are able to predict and plan for weeks in advance rather than guess when that next birthday or wedding is. These measurements should include any or all of the following:

  • exercise plan 
  • nutritional guidance and fluid intake
  • Supplementation
  • sleep tracking
  • scale weight
  • body fat assessments using measures like skinfold tests, bio-electrical impedance analysis or bioimpedance analysis (BIA), photos, etc)
  • recovery using measure like heart rate variability (HRV) and resting heart rate (RHR).

If youโ€™d like to work with Jared or the Bushido Strength Hub team connect with them on Instagram or Facebook.

Can I claim personal training with my health insurance?

To find out how you might be able to claim the costs of personal training or gym memberships with your health insurance speak with a member of the Care To Compare team on 1300 76 76 00.